Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Ombudsperson for Children's Office
Ombudsperson for Children's Office>Survival and Development Rights: The Basic Rights to Life, Survival and Development of One’s Full Potential

Survival and Development Rights: The Basic Rights to Life, Survival and Development of One’s Full Potential


Article 4 (Protection of rights):
 
Governments have a responsibility to take all available measures to make sure children’s rights are respected, protected and fulfilled. When countries ratify the Convention, they agree to review their laws relating to children. This involves assessing their social services, legal, health and educational systems, as well as levels of funding for these services. Governments are then obliged to take all necessary steps to ensure that the minimum standards set by the Convention in these areas are being met. They must help families protect children’s rights and create an environment where they can grow and reach their potential. In some instances, this may involve changing existing laws or creating new ones. Such legislative changes are not imposed, but come about through the same process by which any law is created or reformed within a country. Article 41 of the Convention points out the when a country already has higher legal standards than those seen in the Convention, the higher standards always prevail. (See Optional Protocol pages.)
 
Article 5 (Parental guidance):
 
Governments should respect the rights and responsibilities of families to direct and guide their children so that, as they grow, they learn to use their rights properly. Helping children to understand their rights does not mean pushing them to make choices with consequences that they are too young to handle. Article 5 encourages parents to deal with rights issues "in a manner consistent with the evolving capacities of the child". The Convention does not take responsibility for children away from their parents and give more authority to governments. It does place on governments the responsibility to protect and assist families in fulfilling their essential role as nurturers of children.
 
Article 6 (Survival and development):
 
Children have the right to live. Governments should ensure that children survive and develop healthily.
 
Article 7 (Registration, name, nationality, care):
 
All children have the right to a legally registered name, officially recognised by the government. Children have the right to a nationality (to belong to a country). Children also have the right to know and, as far as possible, to be cared for by their parents.
 
Article 8 (Preservation of identity):
 
Children have the right to an identity – an official record of who they are. Governments should respect children’s right to a name, a nationality and family ties.
 
Article 9 (Separation from parents):
 
Children have the right to live with their parent(s), unless it is bad for them. Children whose parents do not live together have the right to stay in contact with both parents, unless this might hurt the child.
 
Article 10 (Family reunification):
 
Families whose members live in different countries should be allowed to move between those countries so that parents and children can stay in contact, or get back together as a family.
 
Article 14 (Freedom of thought, conscience and religion):
 
Children have the right to think and believe what they want and to practise their religion, as long as they are not stopping other people from enjoying their rights. Parents should help guide their children in these matters. The Convention respects the rights and duties of parents in providing religious and moral guidance to their children. Religious groups around the world have expressed support for the Convention, which indicates that it in no way prevents parents from bringing their children up within a religious tradition. At the same time, the Convention recognizes that as children mature and are able to form their own views, some may question certain religious practices or cultural traditions. The Convention supports children's right to examine their beliefs, but it also states that their right to express their beliefs implies respect for the rights and freedoms of others.
 
Article 18 (Parental responsibilities;
 
state assistance): Both parents share responsibility for bringing up their children, and should always consider what is best for each child. Governments must respect the responsibility of parents for providing appropriate guidance to their children – the Convention does not take responsibility for children away from their parents and give more authority to governments. It places a responsibility on governments to provide support services to parents, especially if both parents work outside the home.
 
Article 20 (Children deprived of family environment):
 
Children who cannot be looked after by their own family have a right to special care and must be looked after properly, by people who respect their ethnic group, religion, culture and language.
 
Article 22 (Refugee children):
 
Children have the right to special protection and help if they are refugees (if they have been forced to leave their home and live in another country), as well as all the rights in the Convention.
 
Article 23 (Children with disabilities):
 
Children who have any kind of disability have the right to special care and support, as well as all the rights in the Convention, so that they can live full and independent lives.
 
Article 24 (Health and health services):
 
Children have the right to good quality health care – the best health care possible – to safe drinking water, nutritious food, a clean and safe environment, and information to help them stay healthy. Rich countries should help poorer countries achieve this.
 
Article 25 (Review of treatment in care):
 
Children who are looked after by their local authorities, rather than their parents, have the right to have these living arrangements looked at regularly to see if they are the most appropriate. Their care and treatment should always be based on “the best interests of the child”. (see Guiding Principles, Article 3)
 
Article 26 (Social security):
 
Children – either through their guardians or directly – have the right to help from the government if they are poor or in need.
 
Article 27 (Adequate standard of living):
 
Children have the right to a standard of living that is good enough to meet their physical and mental needs. Governments should help families and guardians who cannot afford to provide this, particularly with regard to food, clothing and housing.
 
Article 28: (Right to education):
 
All children have the right to a primary education, which should be free. Wealthy countries should help poorer countries achieve this right. Discipline in schools should respect children’s dignity. For children to benefit from education, schools must be run in an orderly way – without the use of violence. Any form of school discipline should take into account the child's human dignity. Therefore, governments must ensure that school administrators review their discipline policies and eliminate any discipline practices involving physical or mental violence, abuse or neglect. The Convention places a high value on education. Young people should be encouraged to reach the highest level of education of which they are capable.
 
Article 29 (Goals of education):
 
Children’s education should develop each child’s personality, talents and abilities to the fullest. It should encourage children to respect others, human rights and their own and other cultures. It should also help them learn to live peacefully, protect the environment and respect other people. Children have a particular responsibility to respect the rights their parents, and education should aim to develop respect for the values and culture of their parents. The Convention does not address such issues as school uniforms, dress codes, the singing of the national anthem or prayer in schools. It is up to governments and school officials in each country to determine whether, in the context of their society and existing laws, such matters infringe upon other rights protected by the Convention.
 
Article 30 (Children of minorities/indigenous groups):
 
Minority or indigenous children have the right to learn about and practice their own culture, language and religion. The right to practice one’s own culture, language and religion applies to everyone; the Convention here highlights this right in instances where the practices are not shared by the majority of people in the country.
 
Article 31 (Leisure, play and culture):
 
Children have the right to relax and play, and to join in a wide range of cultural, artistic and other recreational activities.
 
Article 42 (Knowledge of rights):
 
Governments should make the Convention known to adults and children. Adults should help children learn about their rights, too. (See Protection rights, article 4.)
 


 

 

 
 
 

 

Download PDF Version

Source: UNICEF